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FAQ

WHAT'S CAMBODIA'S CLIMATE LIKE?

There are three seasons in Cambodia, although what they are called and when they start is subject to much debate.

 

The Summer “hot” season runs essentially from March through to June, with temperatures between 33 C – 48 C in the day, and not below 27 C at night.

 

The Monsoon “rainy” season runs from July through to November with frequent heavy rain around 5.00pm.

 

The temperatures range from 32 C during the day to 16 C at night.

 

The winter “cool” season runs from November through to February with temperatures at 32C during the day, to a bearable 16 C at night, although in the North, it could be as low as 12 C.

 

This also doubles up as the dry season During the rainiest months of July to November, we recommend that you pack a light waterproof jacket and a pair of closed shoes.

ARE THERE ANY POISONOUS/DANGEROUS ANIMALS IN CAMBODIA?

Mostly, poisonous animals are found in forests. While participating in an adventurous trip in or near the forest you should be aware of dangerous animals, such as snakes and centipedes.

 

While there certainly are deadly snakes in Cambodia it is extremely uncommon for visitors to see one, let alone be attacked and killed by one.

 

Furthermore, there are no man-eating sharks endemic to Cambodia waters and one’s risk of being killed by a wild tiger is far lower than a road accident.

 

Dangerous wild animals are not a serious concern for travelers to Cambodia.

 

The following are the most dangerous animals you may come across.

 

Cambodia has poisonous snakes, scorpions, centipedes and jellyfish.

 

If you see a centipede, do not try to hold it or touch it, they have an extremely painful sting and if you are stung by one, you will be off your feet for days.

Scorpions like to hide in clothing that’s been left on the floor, in shoes, under logs etc.

 

Snakes can turn up anywhere, even in the cities. If you are bitten, call for help immediately but try not to panic as snake bites are easily survivable and treatments are available everywhere.

 

You should use caution when bathing in the sea. Swimmers have received fatal stings from jellyfish. Certain varieties are very dangerous and are found in coastal waters all around Cambodia.

 

Generally, jellyfish stings are just painful and don’t pose a threat to life. but you should be aware of the dangers.

IS IT SAFE TO DRINK THE WATER?

Despite the fact that the authorities have made efforts to make tap water meet World Health Organization standards, very few people drink tap water in Cambodia, even the local population. Bottled water is widely used instead.

 

Some people actually boil tap water before use, but this will not remove chemical toxins or remnants of whatever else was there before boiling. You should also be careful with ice, as freezing does not protect you from bacteria, viruses or chemicals.

 

Brushing your teeth with tap water is considered to be safe, although those with very sensitive stomachs may occasionally experience problems.

 

In restaurants, you will find the water to be generally safe. You can always buy small bottles if you like but make sure the seal has not been broken.

 

However, you should be very careful with street vendors and street food stalls. The biggest risk is actually from the cleanliness of the glasses themselves.

 

You can become very ill indeed if you are not careful.

 

Drink directly from the bottle if you are in any doubt.

 

Don’t worry too much about the ice that is served in cafes etc as they usually have the ice delivered to them from government inspected ice factories.

WHAT IS THE VOLTAGE OF ELECTRICITY SUPPLY?DO I NEED TO TAKE A CONVERTER?

The electricity in Cambodia is 220 volts, 50 cycles per second.

 

Most receptacles in Cambodia have two prongs, missing the third earth prong at the bottom. However, the newest office and condominium dwellings usually offer the third prong due to increased awareness of the importance of grounding for both safety and equipment damage reasons.

IS IT SAFE TO WALK THE STREETS AT NIGHT?

Cambodia streets are safe to walk during the days than nights. It has a fair shared of crimes just like other cities across Southeast Asia.

 

However, should you walk whether nights or days recommended that you leave your valuables at the hotel in a safe and walk in a group. There are petty crime such as purse snatchers in Phnom Phnom which more often than other cities.

ARE INTERNET AND EMAIL FACILITIES WIDELY AVAILABLE IN CAMBODIA?

Internet services are now available at Cambodia’s leading hotels and at the many “Cyber-Cafes” that are cropping up in all major tourist destinations such as Phnom Penh, Siem Reap, Battambang, Sihanoukville and many other cities.

WHEN IS THE BEST TIME IN THE YEAR TO VISIT CAMBODIA?

The best time to visit Cambodia is during the winter and summer seasons which run from November to April each year. This is the time when we consider a high season. However, the low season from May to October which coincides with the rainy season features much cheaper accommodation.

 

As Cambodia is full of activities, festivals, shopping malls and markets, cultural places, amusement parks to entertain visitors all year round, it is needless to say that Cambodia is the place anyone can enjoy at any moment of the year.

IS ENGLISH WIDELY SPOKEN?

 In Phnom Penh and Siem Reap, where the major business and commercial transactions are held, English is widely spoken, written and understood. Further, in most hotels, shops and restaurants of major tourist destinations, English and some European languages are spoken, written, and understood.

CAN I BUY A SIM CARD FOR MY CELL PHONE?

SIM cards of local Cambodia network providers  such as Smart are widely sold and may be used to call/text both local and internationally.

WHAT ARE SOME CULTURAL DO’S AND DON’T IN CAMBODIA?

In this country of smiles, you will have to keep certain things in mind when you are traveling to ensure that you do not face any problem. Cambodia Do’s and Don’t will provide all the information you need to know about the Etiquette in Cambodia and Code of Conduct in Cambodia. The country has been trying to evolve out of a shattering past of war and violence, which is the main reason behind the sensitiveness of the people about their religious beliefs and social customs. What better way to pay respect to the traditions of the people than to be aware of Do’s and Don’t in Cambodia and follow them.

 

Do’s

  • Ask for permission before taking photographs of any Cambodian people or monks.
  • It is customary to remove your shoes when entering a place of worship such as a pagoda or temple.
  • Additionally, visitors should dress appropriately when inside a religious site (upper arms and legs should be covered, hats removed).
  • It is respectful to remove your shoes when entering someone’s home.
  • Though not always expected, a respectful way of greeting another individual is to bow the head slightly with hands pressed together at the chest (known as “Sampeah”).
  • If invited to dine in a Cambodian family’s home, it is polite to bring a small gift for the host such as fruit, dessert, or flowers.
  • If invited to attend a Cambodian wedding, it is customary to bring cash as a wedding gift.
  • When using a toothpick at the table, use one hand to cover your mouth.
  • Keep business cards ready, and present them with both hands. Accept business cards with both hands.

 

Don’ts

  • Don’t use your feet to point at someone.
  • Don’t touch a Cambodian person on the head.
  • Don’t begin eating if you are a guest at a dinner and the host has yet to take a bite.
  • Women should never touch male monks or hand something directly to them.
  • Keep public displays of affection to a respectful minimum.

WHERE ARE THE FOREIGN EMBASSIES?

click here to see a list of Foreign embassies in Cambodia

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